Ron Varadero Anejo 7 Anos

Ron Varadero aged 7 years rum review by the fat rum pirateRon Varadero is a Cuban rum brand which is extremely popular in Spain.  They have a number of different expressions.  Mostly at the younger end of the scale.

This is one of their two more premium rums. They also have a 15 year old rum in the range.  As mentioned Ron Varadero is popular in Spain where, despite its age is often taken with cola.

It is perhaps not that surprising it is taken with cola when you consider how inexpensive rum in the Spain is.  A bottle of this 7 year old rum will set you back around 12 euros. Regardless of the current exchange rate even if you simply convert euros to Pounds sterling, its very cheap for a 7 year old rum.

The Ron Varadero website is actually quite interesting.  There is a lot of focus on aguardiente.  I certainly learnt quite a bit about how rum is produced in Cuba.  Well worth a read.  I could take parts out of the site but there is so much to read I think its best leaving a link for those who may be interested.

The Ron Varadero logo – the very simplistic red circle, is in fact symbolic of the red sun which sets over Santiago de Cuba. Where Varadero is produced.

Cuban law denotes that the age of the rum indicated on the bottle must be the average age, so there will be both older and younger rum in this blend.  If you find a bottle of this in the UK it will set you back around £20-25. Similar in price to the Havana Club 7.  Like many Cuban rums it is bottled at 38% ABV.Ron Varadero 7 anos rum review by the fat rum pirate

The presentation is familiar, similar to the old style Havana Club 7 bottles.  A tall thin black bottle.  The actual labelling is quite dated but gives an extra authenticity along with the familiar green Guarantia label.  Which denotes this as a true Cuban rum.

I have a few Cuban rums up for review shortly.  It has proven a little tricky.  Reliable information on all the brands that are produced in Cuba and exported into Europe is not forthcoming. Some are mostly domestic brands others are solely for the European market.  It is also quite difficult to determine which distillery they hail from.

From reading around the internet it is highly likely that one or two of my Cuban rums may actually be the same rum.  I have read that this is the same as Havana Club 7.  Though from my experience (and I have tried the two side by side) they did seem quite different rums.

Anyway enough babbling lets see what the Spanish find so intriguing about this rum.

When poured the rum is a fairly dark reddish/orange colour.  It has quite a sweet almost wine like nose.  There are notes of cigar smoke/tobacco and you get some fruity notes of plums and raisins.

The hydrometer test revealed no added sugar but Cuban rum is known to add (or leave in the barrels prior to ageing) wine.  The legality and morality of this is questionable.

not as smoky and tobacco led as Havana Club 7.  It doesn’t have that strong tobacco note put me off that rum.  It’s pleasant and easy going.  There is a lot of fruitiness in the rum.  The plums and raisins are joined by citrus fruits – Limes and bitter oranges.  It slips down all to easily and gives way to a short but not unpleasant slightly smoky finish.

It’s a pretty good easy going sipper.  The lower ABV means there is little burn.  Its lighter sweeter style might not suit all tastes.  I will say though when I am referring to this rum as being sweet I would say it is sweet in the style of Santa Teresa 1796 not Diplomatico Reserva Exclusiva or Ron Millonario.  There is still enough genuine rum character in the spirit.

When mixed it makes very tasty Cuba Libre’s and to be fair if I could pick a bottle of this up for what I paid in Spain it would be staple in my bar.

This is a tasty and for me a good example of a Cuban style rum.

 

 

 

 

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