Elements Eight Republica

ElementsElements Eight Republica rum review by the fat rum pirat Eight Republica sees the UK based rum company move away from the island of St Lucia for the first time.  Since launching in 2006 Elements Eight have focused on a range of rums solely from St Lucia Distillers. Following a re-launch and re-design of the rums range in 2016 Carl Stephenson, the founder of Elements Eight began thinking about releasing rums from other countries/regions.

The result is Elements Eight Republica. A blend of two column distilled blended rums from Cuba and Panama.  The rums have each been aged for 5 years in ex-Bourbon barrels.  It has not been chill filtered nor has any colouring been added to the finished product.  When tested with the Hydrometer the reading is a clean 40% ABV suggesting the rum is pure and unadulterated in line with Elements Eight’s ethos.

The presentation is in keeping with the brands re-launch last year.  The stubby bottle returns as does the decent sized cork stopper.  For Elements Eight Republica they have opted for a blue colour scheme, with the flags of each of the Republics towards the bottom of the front label.  It retails at around £24.99 for a 70cl with an ABV of 40%.  It is currently being distributed by Mangrove in the UK.  I think this is a more than reasonable price.

Elements Eight have also just re-built their website.  So if you are interested in learning more about the company and their other rums the link is here.  I’ve also reviewed their other rums.  The exception being the Platinum which is coming soon – it’s very good for the record.

To my knowledge, I have tried rums from both Panama and Cuba (with varying degrees of success) but never the two blended together.  Elements Eight promise on the rear label that this rum is a break from the “orthodox”.  The Cuban rum provides “earthy, green, dry flavours married with the rich, woody and sweeter Panama”.

Taking this into account I’m immediately thinking about the Bristol Classic Sancti Spiritus Distillery Cuban rum I tried earlier coupled perhaps with the Mezan Panama 1999.  Two rums which I enjoyed and found to be less sweet than the more commercial bottlings from Cuba and Panama.  Elements Eight Republica rum review by the fat rum piratThe rums in this blend hail from the Varela (Panama) and Distilleria Cubay (Cuba).

In the glass Elements Eight Republica is a straw to golden brown colour.  It doesn’t appear to have been coloured in anyway.  From the nose if I was “blind tasting” this rum I would guess it to be coming from Panama.  It has that gentle sweetness that I’ve experienced before with independently bottled Panamanian rums.  It’s not over the top or fussy like I have the Abuelo’s to be.

The nose has a nice weight and a very good balance. Most nuances found in lighter balanced rums reveal themselves.  There is a fruity sweetness which is backed up by a very good, very well balanced oak and smokiness to the rum.  It’s relative youth is shown by a hit of more boozy sweet notes.  However, they do not become overbearing.  It has a nice spiciness to it which gives it quite a complex and pleasing nose.

When sipped more of the Cuban element comes through.  It’s initially sweet but the mid palate dries out quite a bit.  You get more of the grassy, earthy notes coming through the finish is slightly herbal and quite spicy.  There is a definite smokiness running right through the rums delivery.  The finish is also quite long and satisfying.

There isElements Eight Republica rum review by the fat rum pirat more going on with this rum than most column distilled “Spanish” style rums.  Back in 2006 Carl Stephenson had the foresight to begin looking to St Lucia for quality rums and it seems that he has done it again with these rums from Cuba and Panama.

Elements Eight Republica can also be mixed – I as usual tried to with coke and enjoyed it.  To be fair though it was rather a waste of this rum.  It perhaps deserves more respect and if mixed should be used in classic Cuban cocktais such as the Daiquiri.  It works particularly well in Old Cuban or El Presidente.  You will also find it works very nicely in cocktails calling for Scotch Whisky.  So its very versatile.  However, I found it worked best for me on its own.  You could try a cigar but I only smoke when I’m on fire.

A really good rum at the price.  Well at any price really.

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