Cadenhead’s JMWP Worthy Park Distillery Aged 11 Years

Cadenhead's Jamaica Worthy Park JMWP Rum review by the fat rum pirate

This is a Jamaican Rum from Worthy Park – hence the JMWP (JaMaica Worthy Park).  Worthy Park only re-opened and began distilling rum again in 2005 so this is a bottling which comes from their first year of production.

Cadenhead’s have been bottling rum for quite some time now.  They release a number of rums at 46% ABV as part of their Green Label series.  For the more serious rum drinker they also have their Cask Strength Dated Distillation series.  Which this bottlings is a part of.

It was bonded in 2005 and bottled in 2016.  As mentioned this is a Cask Strength rum bottled at 57.9% ABV.  It has not been chill filtered nor has it had any additives.  As Cadenhead’s note on the rear label it is an authentic product of the distillery.

It is also noted as being a Pot Still rum.  The retail on a 70cl bottle was £51.50 or thereabouts.  The rum was bonded in 2005 and bottled in December 2016.  You can still find the odd bottle online.  For some reason Cadenhead’s do not reveal the number of bottles available – the likes of Duncan Taylor and Blackadder always do.

As well as featuring Cadenhead’s rums in the past we have also covered output from Worthy Park.  Most rums from both sides have had good reviews so this in theory should be one of my better purchases.

I am of the opinion that Worthy Park rums will become increasingly popular and sought after in the next few years.  They are producing rums that whilst very Jamaican also have their own distinctive identity.

I’m not madly keen on the colour scheme used on these bottlings, particularly the card sleeve.  Its very seventies living room all brown and orange!  Still you get a nice stubby bottle and cork stopper and I quite like the orange “lid” on the cork.

Cadenhead's Jamaica Worthy Park JMWP Rum review by the fat rum pirate

Cadenhead’s give you a lot of valuable information on the bottle (much like their Scottish counterparts Duncan Taylor and Hunter Laing).  No doubt the traditions of giving facts rather than marketing stories stems from bottling Independent whisky.

In the glass we have a very vibrant golden brown coloured spirit.  It’s nice to see such an attractive looking spirit which as had no colouring added to it.

On the nose anyone familiar with Worthy Park releases will immediately recognise this as a rum from the distillery.  Like Appleton Estate and Monymusk – Worthy Park have a distinctive take on Jamaican rum.

Rich toffee and a touch of butterscotch is first on the nose.  A further nose reveals the interaction with oak from the 11 years of ageing.  There is a nice balanced spiciness running alongside the sweeter notes.  You get a little Jamaican funk but not a great deal.  Touches of funky burnt banana and a touch of overripe pineapple – maybe a little stewed scrumpy apples.

Also apparent on the nose is a sort of “real ale” kind of yeastiness which gives the rum a slightly savoury note.

Sipping the rum at full strength reveals more of the savoury elements first hinted at in the nose.  It’s quite dry and a touch malty.  I won’t say its exactly like whisky in terms of flavour but it has certain similarities.  There is a maltiness to it.

Cadenhead's Jamaica Worthy Park JMWP Rum review by the fat rum pirate

There is a really nice weight of oak and spices – which add a touch of sweetness and a lot of complexity.  You mouth starts to do a little dance and the taste buds start to water.  It’s still pretty dry but its very moreish.  The spices are tingling on the tongue and adding a lot of spicy sweet/sour flavour.

Further sips definitely reveal more from this rum.  The toffee notes from the nose return as does a little bitter cocoa and some dark chocolate.  It’s not the kind of rum you will just have one glass of.  If you are going to sit down with this rum then you need to give it plenty time and plenty of attention.  There is a lot going on that single glass maybe won’t always reveal.  The more you sip you notice little nuances and touches of fruity flavour.

The finish is long and lingering.  It isn’t hugely oaked but it is quite spicy.  There is quite a nice peppery heat.

You can if you wish water this down to a more manageable level (say around 45-50%). On this occasion I found it even at Cask Strength to be very drinkable.

Really good rum from an up and coming distillery.  I don’t know how much time was spent in the tropics v Europe but I do have another bottling up for review soon which has been aged solely in the tropics.

Question is – Is it better than this wonderful bottling?

 

 

 

 

 

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