Bacardi Anejo

Bacardi Anejo Rum Review by the fat rum pirateBacardi Anejo. Aside from the usual Bacardi bottles you find in the Supermarket and Duty Free a trip to the continent (and further a field) can often throw up a few more variations from the Puerto Rican rum powerhouses.

I picked up this bottle of Bacardi Anejo in May 2019 on holiday in Salou. I think the 1 litre bottle was around €15. I’d not seen this particular expression before. I could tell from the presentation (and the dustiness) of the bottle that it was not a “new” release.

Bacardi re-designed their logo around 2015 so this is definitely before then. Such is the volume of Bacardi’s output you see releases still available for years after they are discontinued. Indeed Bacardi recently released a 4 year old Cuatro Anejo.

I’ve looked around for some information on this rum and have been able to determine the following. As is noted on the rear of the bottle this is not a Puerto Rican rum. It was actually distilled a the first distillery Bacardi opened outside of Cuba way back in 1929. Destileria de Galarza in Mexico. The Spanish writing on the label suggests is was produced primarily for the Spanish speaking market. I cannot ever recall seeing this rum in the UK.

It is produced from fermented molasses, distilled on multi column stills and is aged in ex-bourbon barrels, for up to 3 years. Some websites state it has rum aged up to 6 years old. It is bottled at 38% ABV.

It is presented in what was the familiar Bacardi style of the nineties and for much of this century, until the recent re-branding. The opaque bottle hides the colour of the liquid it has a plastic screw cap and there is a diffuser in the neck of the bottle. To prevent “re-filling the bottle” with Bacardi Anejo Rum Review by the fat rum piratecheaper or inferior spirit.

In glass we have a fairly light brown spriit. A shade or two darker than straw but not quite dark enough to refer to as golden brown.

The nose is very light. It’s slightly “stony” and quite reminiscent of most Bacardi rums. It has a weird grainy, mineral like taste. This one however lacks some of the sweeter buttery notes that were found in the Anejo Cuatro or the Ocho released over the past couple of years.

There is some light oak spices and some gentle alcohol notes. It’s quite weak on the nose but there is a fair amount of booze coming through. Young alcohol, nothing more really of note, unfortunately.

Sipped, it just tastes like a watery version of the Anejo Cuatro. It’s light with a slight butteriness, theres a little integration of oak and a touch of light spices. Some shortbread and a touch of tobacco mingle alongside each other. Some light smoky notes.

I’m using light too much but that is essentially what this is. Dialled down to 38% ABV it makes for a very watery and very light rum. There’s little to no body and it’s all just a bit meh. Well actually a lot meh.

The initial sips greats you with Bacardi’s trademark sweet entry. It then mBacardi Anejo Rum Review by the fat rum pirateoves onto some ginger and some light notes of pepper. The finish is next to non-existant as the ginger and pepper are overtaken by a slight bitter tobacco note which quickly fades away. All of this is running alongside some rough sweet alcohol which is delivering most if not all the flavour. A good sipper it is not.

And to be fair its probably not meant to be a sipper. So how do we see this one as a mixer? Shall we try it with cola?

It’s pretty forgetful to be honest.  It reminds me very much of Bacardi Black, only I must admit its not quite as tobacco heavy as that monstrosity. This is just weaker and less flavourful. Again all I get is a bit of a sweet tobacco note and some booze.

It’s all just so boring. Hang on a minute. Urgh there is a nasty almost artificial kind of aftertaste as well. Bitter nastiness.

Best avoided even if it is pretty cheap.

 

 

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